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Showing posts with label Wrasse. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Wrasse. Show all posts

California Sheephead (Semicossyphus pulcher)

The California Sheephead or Semicossyphus pulcher is just one of the over 600 different species of Wrasse. This saltwater fish is found in the eastern Pacific Ocean, often in kelp forests or around rocky reefs. The male California Sheephead is black, with a white jaw and red body.  The female is pink in coloration. Juveniles are bright red with a white stripe down its body, and a black spot on the caudal fin. All California Sheepheads start out their lives as females, but then some change to males when they are about half grown. As you can imagine with their great variation in color between the sexes this is quite the transformation to be seen.
These fish can reach lengths of 36" (92cm) and weigh in at 35lbs (16kg). California Sheephead feed on sea urchins, molluscs, lobsters, and crabs. As you can see in the picture below these fish have an impressive set of chompers which allows them to eat such hard shelled crustaceans. 
You can check out the California Sheephead in action along with a bunch of other species in the video below.


If you have any additional information about the California Sheephead please leave us a comment below.




Slingjaw Wrasse (Epibulus insidiator)

The Slingjaw Wrasse or Epibulus insidiator is without a doubt one of the strangest fish in our oceans. This fish has an extendo mouth that protrudes out from its body to gobble up unsuspecting prey.  This "slingjaw" can extend to half this fish's body!  You can watch this for yourself in the videos below.



Much like the deep sea Goblin Shark, this fish could easily be the inspiration for several modern day horror films. Lucky for us, this fish only grows to about 1' in length, so they are no danger to humans.  This species of Wrasse is found in the Indian and Pacific Oceans in shallow, tropical waters.  It will normally feed on small fish, crabs and shrimp, but watch out you never know when a Slingjaw Wrasse might be coming for your toe!

This saltwater fish is also a protogynous hermaphrodite, that is it starts life as a female, but as it grows larger it becomes a male.  The females will be a light brown or yellow coloration with the males featuring a dark stripe behind their eyes, with bits of white, yellow, brown and orange.   

If you have any additional information about the Slingjaw Wrasse please leave us a comment below.



Birdmouth Wrasse (Gomphosus caeruleus)

The Birdmouth Wrasse or Gomphosus caeruleus gets its name from its elongated snout which resembles that of a bird. As you can imagine this bizarre appearance along side their constant moment in an aquarium makes them a favorite pet. Many people also say that this fish looks and swims just like a dolphin which adds to their appeal.

This saltwater fish is sometimes known as the Green Birdmouth Wrasse, and is one of the over 400 different species of Wrasses in the Labridae family. This particular species is found in the Indo-Pacific and can grow to about 10" in length. Birdmouth Wrasse adult males are blueish green while females and younger males are brown.  You can check out this Wrasse in the video below...


In an aquarium the Birdmouth Wrasse should be fed a variety of foods including, mysis shrimp, krill, brineshrimp and some greens. They are considered to be peaceful, but their constant activity can annoy some cranky tankmates.  They require a rather large tank of at least 70 gallons.  

If you have any additional information about the Birdmouth Wrasse please leave us a comment below.

Tautog (Tautoga onitis)

The Tautog or Tautoga onitis is a saltwater fish that is often sought after by anglers from Nova Scotia to Georgia in the Atlantic Ocean. This fish from the Wrasse family is often found in a bottom that has structure, like ship wrecks, rocks or mussel beds. This rough territory make it easy for a Tautog to tangle the anglers line and break free.

Also known as the Blackfish, they are brown or dark olive with white blotches. Tautog can grow to about 3' (1m) and can weigh up to 25lbs. These fish have powerful jaws and two sets of teeth, one in the front and one in the back of their throat that helps them to crush crustaceans and mollusks of all sorts. They also have a slime of sorts that covers their bodies, much like some Northern Pike. This helps them glide off sharp rocks that they may encounter while swimming.

When fishing for a Tautog it is critical that you wait a moment to set the hook as you almost need to wait for the Tautog to swallow the bait before you can hook them. Popular baits for Tautog include crabs, clams, shrimp, sandworms and even lobster. Spearfishing is another way to catch the elusive Tautog. They are said to be quite calm around scuba divers. You can check them out underwater in the video below...

Spawning of the Tautog will often happen in the late spring or early summer in an offshore location. Once hatched the little ones will often take shelter in seaweed until they are large enough to venture out on their own into the big water. Because of the relatively slow reproduction rate of the Tautog, these fish are very vulnerable to overfishing. Please practice catch and release when possible.

If you have any additional information about the Tautog please leave us a comment below.

Blue Star Leopard Wrasse (Macropharyngodon bipartitus)


The Blue Star Leopard Wrasse or Macropharyngodon bipartitus is one of the over 500 different species of Wrasse Fish in the world. This particular species is from the Labridae family, and goes by a few different names including the Vermiculite Wrasse, and the Divided Wrasse.  These fish originate from Africa, and are quite small, only growing to about 5" in maximum length.  

As you can see, they are brilliantly colored with yellows, oranges, browns and a series of light blue spots that cover its body. Their distinct coloration makes them a favorite pet for an aquarium. If you are considering buying a Blue Star Leopard Wrasse for your tank you should know that they thrive under the following water conditions, 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4 and sg 1.020-1.025. These saltwater fish are not very easy to care for, and require an aquarium of about 60 gallons or more. They are carnivores that should be fed brine shrimp, mysis shrimp, pellet food, flake food and other meaty preparations.  You can check out a Blue Star Leopard Wrasse in an aquarium in the video below...

If you have any additional information about Blue Star Leopard Wrasse including care tips please leave us a comment.




Twin Spot Wrasse (Coris aygula)

The Twin Spot Wrasse or Coris aygula is just one of the over 500 different species of Wrasse fish on our planet! This saltwater fish can be differentiated from other species by the two dark spots that adorn its dorsal fin when it is young. This fish will have a silver coloration with dark spots on its head. As it grows older though, it will turn a dark bluish green and develop a white or green band around its body. They will look like a totally different species to tell you the truth. You can check out a young Twin Spot Wrasse in the video below...

Also known as the Clown Coris and the Twinspot Coris, this fish will grow to about 2' in maximum length, so if you are thinking of housing one in an aquarium be sure to have lot of room. An aquarium of over 200 gallons is highly recommended. The following water conditions are acceptable, 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4 and sg 1.020-1.025. Providing this Wrasse with a nice thick layer of sand on the bottom will keep it happy. They tend to bury themselves in a natural environment, so this will help them feel right at home.

Twin Spot Wrasse are considered to be quite aggressive and should only be kept with fish with similar temperaments. A single male Twin Spot can be kept with multiple females, but keeping two males in one tank is not recommended.

These fish are carnivores that should be fed mysis shrimp, flake food, pellet food, frozen brine shrimp and other meaty foods. In the wild they eat crabs, shrimp, urchins, and other small creatures. If you have any additional information about the Twin Spot Wrasse leave us a comment!

Radiant Wrasse (Halichoeres iridis)


The Radiant Wrasse or Halichoeres iridis is just one of the many different species of Wrasse Fish that inhabit the oceans of our world. This particular saltwater species goes by a few different names including, Orangehead Wrasse, Iridis Wrasse, and Africa Wrasse. These fish originate in Eastern Africa, and are not very large, only growing to about 4-1/2" in length. You can check out the Radiant Wrasse underwater in the video below...

As the Radiant Wrasse grow older it becomes more... well... radiant! Their colors of dark red on their body and a bright yellow, green and orange on their face make this a fantastic fish for an aquarium! The following water conditions in an aquarium of at least 50 gallons is acceptable, 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4 and sg 1.020-1.025. Make sure you have a lid as these fish have been known to jump ship.Like many other Wrasse, they will hide in the sandy bottom if startled. So adding a nice layer of sand at the bottom of your tank well help to keep these fish healthy and happy. Radiant Wrasse are a helpful addition to other tankmates as well, eating parasites off of the other fish in the tank. They should fed a carnivorous diet consisting of frozen mysis shrimp and brine shrimp as well as flake and pellet food.

Mystery Wrasse (Pseudocheilinus ocellatus)

The Mystery Wrasse or Pseudocheilinus ocellatus is one of the most sought after saltwater fish for an aquarium. Also known as the Whitebarred Wrasse, Tail Spot Wrasse and the Fivebarred Wrasse this fish is extremely colorful with blue, yellow and purple around its head. It has electric blue vertical stripes on its reddish purple body and a spot on its tail that is designed to fool predators. These stripes can fade, or even disappear as this fish grows older. Like a lot of Wrasse fish, they tend to change colors over their lifetime. Young Mystery Wrasse can be green, but will soon turn to the more familiar reddish purple body. They can grow to about 4.7 inches (12 cm).If you are lucky enough to find a Mystery Wrasse you should house them in an aquarium of at least 60 gallons. A reef tank with live rock and a sandy bottom is preferred. The following water conditions are acceptable, 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, and sg 1.021-1.025. These fish are carnivores that should be fed mysis shrimp, brine shrimp, meaty foods, flake food and pellet food. They will also feed off of small crustaceans and ornamental shrimp, if given the chance. Once establish they are a very easy fish to care for and considered to be quite hardy. You can check out the Mystery Wrasse in an aquarium in the video below...

Another reason these fish are so popular in an aquarium is their playful behavior. They are also active in the day time and will tend to rest at night like many aquarium fish.  If you have any additional information about the Mystery Wrasse please leave us a comment below. 

Lyretail Wrasse (Thalassoma lunare)

Lyretail Wrasse (Thalassoma lunare) is a colorful saltwater fish that is often kept in an aquarium setting. Also known as the Lunare Wrasse, Crescent Wrasse and the Moon Wrasse, this fish has a green coloration as an adult with the striking facial and fin markings that make Wrasse fish so very popular. As a juvenile the Lyretail Wrasse will be different colors than as an adult. You might not even recognize them as the change from blue, yellow, green and red variations over their lifetimes. You can see just how active the Moon Wrasse are in the video below...


There are over 600 different species of Wrasse fish which makes them one of the largest families of fish in the world! The Lyretail Wrasse requires a large aquarium of 125 gallons or more and should only be kept with other aggressive fish. Watch out this species of fish can even become territorial and attack new tankmates. It is best to add them into the tank last if at all possible. As with other Wrasses, they should be given plenty of hiding spots. They can grow to about 10" in maximum length and should be kept in the following water conditions 72-78° F, dKH 8-12, pH 8.1-8.4, sg 1.020-1.025. Watch out this fish is a carnivore that will eat mantis shrimp and bristleworms, but it will not disturb your corals or live plants. In the aquarium the Lyretail Wrasse can be fed brine shrimp, bloodworms, flakes and marine pellet food.

If you have any additional information about the Lyretail Wrasse please leave us a comment below.
 

Banana Wrasse (Thalassoma lutescens)

The Banana Wrasse or Thalassoma lutescens is a brilliantly colored aquarium fish. They will grow to a maximum length of 1', so you are thinking of keeping one as a pet you need a tank that is at least 60 gallons. These fish like many other aggressive fish will jump right out of the tank so be sure to have a tight cover. Banana Wrasse prefers temperatures of 72-78° F and a PH level of 8.1-8.4. They are considered to be an easy fish to care for, but should be kept only with other aggressive fish like Triggerfish, Puffers or Tangs. As the fish matures, it will turn yellow if female and blue if it is a male, but don't worry it will retain its strange facial and fin markings. These fish are found in the Western Pacific ocean and were first discovered in Fiji. In its natural environment it will feed on small fish, crustaceans and worms. In an aquarium setting though, it should be fed flaked foods, feeder shrimp and other frozen meats.

This saltwater fish is also known as the Yellow-brown Wrasse, Sunset Wrasse, Yellow Wrasse or Green Moon Wrasse.



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