Find Your Fish

Largemouth Bass

The Largemouth Bass or Micropterus salmoides is one of the most popular sporting fish in North America. These fish go by a few different names including the Green Bass, Oswego Bass, Black Bass, and the Green Trout just to name a few.  They feed on crayfish, sunfish, aquatic insects, frogs and other small freshwater fish. In the picture above they are feeding on a Rock Bass. Most of the time you won't find these type of fish over 20 feet below the surface, so they tend to be fairly easy for fishermen to hook. Catching them is another story, they are known as great fighters! They reach around 40" in maximum length and weigh up to 26lbs. The Largemouth Bass can only live into their early 20's. This fish is found in ponds, lakes and reservoirs throughout Southern Canada and The United States. Unlike the Smallmouth Bass, the Largemouth prefers swallower, warmer water. You can check out the Largemouth Bass underwater in the video below...

Largemouth Bass will spawn in the late winter to early spring or once the water temperatures reach about 60F.  Male Largemouth will make up a nest for the female in waters from 1' to 4' deep.  Once the female lays her eggs she leaves and the male stays to guard the nest. 

Any fishing tips? Leave them below...

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

I have luck catching largemouth bass in shallow lily beds using a floating frog lure. Hope this helps...

Anonymous said...

I used a maribou jig for the last Largemouth Bass that I caught... Seemed to work well!

Ultralight Bass Fishing said...

I prefer using ultralight fishing tackle. You don't always catch the big ones, but the ones you catch are perfect size for the frying pan!

Anonymous said...

i just hooked a bass today on a black and blue football head jig that was at least 24 inches long and it weighed enough to snap my line which was 10 lb test

Aquarium Fish Of The Month - Spotted Cardinalfish

Still Can't Find The Fish You Are Looking For? Search For It Below Or Send Us An E-Mail!

Fish Index Followers