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Red Turquoise Discus (Symphysodon aequifasciatus)

Red Turquoise Discus Fish are one of several different varieties of Discus with the same scientific name Symphysodon aequifasciatus. The Pigeon Blood Discus for example is considered the same species, but the controlled breeding allows them to be a completely different colors. Red Turquoise Discus are turquoise with red stripes that grace their bodies in a strange pattern. These fish have red eyes and a bit of red on their fins. The coloration of this fish can variety greatly depending on its mood and the health of this freshwater fish. This makes them a favorite among aquarium enthusiasts.

Red Turquoise Discus can grow to about 9" in maximum length, but tend to look much larger because they are as tall as they are long. They are not the easiest fish to care for because they require very clean water, and the following water conditions, 79-86° F, KH 1-3, and pH 6.1-7.5. A water conditioner or reverse osmosis filtration system to soften the water will really help maintain the soft water for these fish to thrive. These fish are carnivores that should be fed foods including bloodworms, tubifex, pellet food, and specially designed Discus flake food. An aquarium of 40 gallons or more is suitable with plenty of hiding spots and plants.
It is quite possible to breed the Red Turquoise Discus fish in captivity. Making the water a bit warmer, and slightly acidic will encourage spawning. The Discus fish needs a flat surface to lay the eggs on, normally a broad leaf will work or they will just use a clean side of the aquarium. After the fry are hatched, make sure to keep them the same tank as their parents. The fry will actually feed off of the parent mucus that secretes out of their bodies like something out of a science fiction film. You can see it for yourself in the video below at about the 2 minute mark...


1 comment:

Forlan said...

nice fish but it is difficult to care

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